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Posts Tagged ‘net10’

A happy pony — ditching the landline part 3

June 25, 2011 2 comments

My MLP avatar courtesy generalzoi's My Little Pony generator

Bill Clinton’s stellar performance this morning — 3 out of 3 My Little Pony questions right on “Wait Wait” — is the reason for this slightly pony-themed entry in my “ditching the landline” series.

Once I knew my port was in progress, I was refreshing my Google Voice status page faster than Applejack at harvest time. And here’s one of many things Google got right: even when there was no news, the status messages about my port got a datestamp that reassured me that somewhere, somepony was taking care of things for me.

This morning, I was excited to find the status message replaced by an honest to goodness dashboard. And while perusing all those options, and trying to decide whether to enable call screening (and have unknown callers leave their names), I got my first call to my old landline number on my cell. I was sold on the feature — I doubt telemarketers and robocallers will play the home version of the game.

So far my favorite feature is the ability to set a schedule for when calls will go through to my cell (weekends and evenings) and when they’ll go to voicemail (when I’m at work). And when I’m not taking the calls, I can still monitor them and read the transcriptions via email, just like I could with Vonage.

In all, it took me 9 days and $50 to get my landline moved from Vonage to Google Voice, and despite my antsiness the process was actually pretty seamless. My main recommendations to anyone else wanting to move their landline from Vonage to Google Voice are:

  • Do your homework. Everyone’s experience is a little different, but reading enough of the horror and success stories gives you an idea of what to expect, and the more prepared you are the fewer surprises there will be.
  • Be patient. I know some people report the whole thing being done in a few days but it could take a lot longer — up to a month by some accounts.
  • Know thy enemy Vonage. Be aware of your billing cycle — if you can, start the process at the beginning rather than the end — and contact them to cancel at 9:00 am eastern time the next business day after the initial port is complete.
  • Use a cheap no-contract provider. I used Net10 but others are probably just as good. The high degree of automation that makes them cheap means you can run the whole game without having to spend any time listening to elevator music whilst waiting for the next available operator. And while it might mean a tougher time if something goes wrong, this will be less likely if you’ve done the hoofwork.

Now if you’ll excuse me… I have some more options to play with. Geek out!

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What a difference a day makes — ditching the landline part 2

June 24, 2011 2 comments

Talking dimeYesterday I wrote about wanting to avoid the nickle-and-dime ($50 and $100) tactics of various phone and internet companies by ditching my Vonage landline, and keeping the number (for free) via Google Voice. As Google Voice doesn’t port landlines, I decided on Net10 as a cheap way to move my number to a wireless carrier first.

But seven days after activating my Net10 phone, I still didn’t have the number fully ported and it was looking like Vonage might be able to nick me for another monthly fee (today would mark the start of my Vonage monthly billing cycle). Read more…

Let’s talk nickles and dimes — ditching the landline

June 23, 2011 2 comments

Talking Nickels and DimesWhen I was a kid, I saved my money for trips to the candy store. Well it was technically a “stationery store” but I rarely made it past the front counters which featured many nickle and dime options for satisfying my desire for sweets.

Years later, some in my college cohort had other cravings that could be satisfied by nickles and dimes, though under these circumstances it meant getting set back by $5 or $10.

Now it seems our collective hunger for data and communication services are getting us nickled and dimed to the tune of $50 to $100 month. Read more…